Who You Calling a Seton?

Image

One of the lamest parts about having a chronic fistula is having the dreaded seton band hanging there like a rubber noose of doom. Often doctors use the seton band to aid in healing and draining of the fistula. Here is the best (and least gross) image I could find:

Image

The worst part of this seemingly harmless rubber band is that it hangs out of your bum (depending on where your fistula is located), and creates all sorts of irritation, pain, and hygiene issues. I have a few suggestions for how to cope with this little rubber demon. Here are a few items I recommend you purchase:

Image

First and foremost you are going to want to keep the area around the band (the part of the band that sticks out) as clean as possible. I recommend getting a simple squeeze bottle that you can keep in the bathroom, and a smaller one to take with you for longer outings. Just fill it up with warm water, and after a bowel movement or even urinating, just spray yourself down! I’ve found water works the best for getting everything super clean, though baby wipes are a lifesaver when you’re out n’ about.

Now, PAY ATTENTION TO THIS PART!!! I wasn’t given this tip until about a month of living with the seton bands. First of all, go out and get some Calmoseptine ointment. You can order some on Amazon.com (I got a great deal on a bulk purchase), or you can ask your pharmacist to order some–it’s over the counter, but they often don’t carry it in most drug stores. Calmoseptine has helped me so much throughout the entire fistula journey, but was most helpful during the awful seton days. Here is what I did:

1. Put a generous amount of Calmoseptine (in a pinch, Butt Paste in the baby aisle is basically the same thing without the menthol cooling effect) on the area surrounding the protruding band.

2. Take a small layer of gauze (not too thick or it will cause its own chaffing), and fold it around the band that is sticking out.

3. If you can, try to tuck the band back a bit so that it doesn’t move as much when you walk.

I had days where I couldn’t walk because the chaffing of the band caused so much irritation it was too painful to move my lower half. The Calmoseptine combined with the gauze definitely helped a lot. I also recommend you double your sitz bath usage. You can add some lavender essential oil to the warm water to calm the skin, or some witch hazel to ease itching and inflammation (use caution as certain oils and ointments can cause more irritation for people who have sensitivities to them).

Your time with the seton band (or bands in some cases) could be as short as a few weeks, or it could be months. I had mine in for 5 months, and they were probably some of my worst days. Don’t lose hope! The suggestions I’ve made helped me so much, but I didn’t learn them until a month in. If those methods don’t ease the irritation, talk to your doctor. Never be afraid to tell your doctor how much pain or discomfort you’re feeling. It took me a month to speak up, and only then did my doctor suggest Calmoseptine. Unfortunately, most doctors and surgeons do not prepare you or give you all of the tips you need. You have to ask them. Be pushy. Don’t forget that YOU are in charge of your recovery and healing, and THEY work for US.

Be bold, be brave, and keep your head up!

Until next week,

Leah R. Chatterjee

fistulasurvival@gmail.com