Aftercare Instructions

Many of us don’t get proper aftercare instructions after fistula surgery. A friend in my support group shared photos of her aftercare instructions, and they were so good that I had to type them up to share with all of you. I turned them into images so that they can be easily saved and shared from most platforms. Please feel free to save and share them!

Please note that these instructions aren’t perfect, just the best I have seen so far, and they won’t apply to everyone. If you are unsure about your aftercare, I urge you to call your surgeon’s office to have them answer any questions.

(All of this information comes from a handout by Alberta Health Services)




Fistula Friends: Some Crohn’s and Ostomy support!

You know, sometimes the universe has your back. I’ve been wanting to write about Crohn’s disease and ostomy tips for quite some time, but it’s hard to write authentically about what you don’t know. I could easily gather a lot of info, and provide you with an article you could’ve written yourself with enough Google searching, but that’s not really what this blog is about. It’s about helping you through this with some guidance from someone who’s been there.

That’s why I’m so excited that Jen connected with me recently. She writes a really wonderful blog on Tumblr that covers a lot of ground, and has especially great info Crohn’s and ostomy tips. I particularly love her attitude about it all, and I think you’ll find it refreshing. 

Jen’s Crohnic Crohn’s blog!

Jen also pointed me towards this wonderful blog that has great info about ostomy products, tips, info on IBD, and has some great tips for diet and nutrition (especially if you’re vegan): 

The Veganostomy Blog

I would really love to give extra voice to these topics (Crohn’s, ostomy, IBD), and I think a great way to do that is to interview several people in the community and share their stories. If you are interested in participating in this (and you may do so anonymously if preferred) please contact me directly at leahruthe@gmail.com

So much love and solidarity,

Leah R Chatterjee 

Fistulotomy: a brief explanation

  
1. A probe is inserted, and the surgeon will cut open along the entire length of the fistula, from the internal opening to the external opening.

2. The surgeon will then flush out the contents of the now-open tract, and flatten it out.

3. Finally, the surgeon will sew the skin edges of the tract to keep it flat, and ideally the fistula will heal over the course of a month or two into a flat scar.

How to Reach Me

If you have any personal or private (or embarrassing) questions for me, I have set up an e-mail for this topic:

fistulasurvival@gmail.com

Please feel free to write me with questions, advice or tips, feedback, or general support. I might not be able to answer every question, but I’ll do my darnedest to try. Sometimes it’s nice to just have someone who’s been through the same thing to talk to, and I always can find time to do that for anyone who needs extra support. 

Happy Friday!

Leah R. Chatterjee