Advancement Flap Surgery

One of the most common surgeries available to close a fistula is called the advancement flap surgery. If you have a colorectal fistula, there is a good chance you will hear about this option somewhere down the line. I’ve sketched my own depiction of the surgery here:

  

What you are looking at is the fistula from the inside of the rectum. Simply put, the surgeon will cut a piece (or flap) of tissue near the fistula hole, and stretch it over the hole like a patch. Sutures are used to keep it in place.

Here are several questions you might want to ask your doctor before you decide to have the surgery:

1) What is the state of my tissue in that area? Is it in good shape for surgery? As we get older our tissue can weaken. If you have had multiple surgeries in that area, the tissue might not be in the best shape. Your doctor should know whether or not the tissue is good enough for a strong flap, but asking is always a good idea.

2) Am I clear of all infections? Any kind of infection can compromise healing. If you feel something might be “off,” have frequent diarrhea, or stomach cramps, ask your doctor to run some tests and stool samples. You know best what your body feels like when it’s healthy, so don’t be afraid to insist on lab work before going in for surgery. 

3) What can I do after surgery to help the healing process? Ask your doctor about how to properly take your antibiotics and pain medications. Ask about what foods to eat, and what foods to avoid. It is very important to eat well after this surgery, and to be conscious of eating foods that will pass through the rectum easily. 

4) How can I best manage my pain and physical discomfort after surgery? Every person is different, has different levels of pain, and different reactions to pain. This surgery can take time to recover fully from, and there will be at least a few days of serious discomfort and/or pain. It is important to prepare for this beforehand.

5) How should I keep the area clean? After surgery the area will be tender, there will be some bleeding, and keeping the area as clean as you can is important. (In this seton band article I give tips on keeping things clean)

According to most literature currently available, the advancement flap surgery has a success rate of about 70%. Many studies reported causes of failure were often due to the presence of Crohn’s Disease. I would advise that you not get too caught up in numbers. Do your research, talk to your doctor about concerns (don’t be embarrassed, colorectal surgeons have heard it ALL), and get a second opinion if necessary. 

Best of luck to all of you on the fistula journey. As always, feel free to contact me with questions or comments. I will do my best to get back to you in a timely manner. Please remember that I am NOT a doctor, just someone who has lived through a 3 year fistula, and has accrued what I hope to be valuable knowledge and experience on the subject. 

Leah R. Chatterjee

2 thoughts on “Advancement Flap Surgery

  1. I just came across your site! I was desperately looking for a resource just like this one about four months ago when I was getting ready for incision and drainage of a perianal abscess and placement of seton. Thank you for being so open and honest. Fistulas are certainly a topic nobody wants to discuss, but, like you, I’m passionate about building awareness. Thanks so much for all you’ve shared here. You rock! 🙂

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